FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

What paperwork is required for U.S. Customs Brokerage services?

In order for a U.S. Customs Broker to file a Customs entry on behalf of an importer, it must have a signed Power of Attorney in place, signed by an officer of the company.  If the importer chooses to import on a continuous surety bond, an application to CBP must be filled out.

Moreover, Scarbrough requires a client application to be in place.  All documents can be found here: Be a Client.

An importer is also required to send (or have its supplier send) the commercial invoice and packing list to the broker.  If a partner government agency (PGA such as FDA, EPA, USDA, etc.) is involved, other paperwork is required.

What paperwork is required for import transportation services only?

Scarbrough requires a client application to be in place only.  If Scarbrough is also providing U.S. Customs Brokerage services, then we will also need a POA.  Refer to the required paperwork for U.S. Customs Brokerage services above.

What paperwork is required for export transportation services?

Document requirements change depending on which country you are exporting to, so it is best to ask an export expert based on your information.  Export transportation providers do require a shippers letter of instruction or power of attorney to ship goods abroad.

If an exporter is shipping via air freight, a consent to screen form written on the exporter’s letterhead is required. Moreover, Scarbrough requires a client application to be in place. All documents can be found here >> Be a Client

An exporter is also required to send its commercial invoice and packing list to the broker.

What is the import process?

Watch this short snippet for a better understanding of the import process into the United States.  For more information, don’t hesitate to contact our team at insidesales@scarbrough-intl.com

What is the export process?

Watch this short snippet for a better understanding of the export process from the United States.  For more information, don’t hesitate to contact our team at insidesales@scarbrough-intl.com

What are incoterms?

Incoterms are agreed upon between the seller and buyer in regards to when the risk and responsibility of the goods and transport are transferred. Incoterms are not binding and they are solely used as a guide.  When buying goods, we recommend EXW or F Terms.  When selling goods, we recommend C Terms.

Download an Incoterms® 2010 Chart of Responsibility Guide

How does Less than Container Load (LCL) Cargo work?

Watch this short 3 minute video that explains the process of an LCL shipment.

What is an HTS Number?

A harmonized tariff schedule number is a 10 digit code that identifies a produce to Customs.  This number is required to file a U.S. Customs entry and it is the ultimate responsibility of the importer of record to make the decision or sign off on which HTS number to use. If you don’t know the HTS number, we suggest you start with CROSS (CBP’s Customs Rulings Online Searching System)  or you can search by chapter in the actual Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States.

Scarbrough is known for its expertise in HTS classification, Over 20% of its import staff are licensed U.S. Customs brokers. If you have a question about HTS classification or would like us to classify a product for you, please email consulting@scarbrough-intl.com.

 

What is a Schedule B Number?

A schedule B number is a 10-digit number specific to exports only that identifies the product to Customs.  You can find the Schedule B Number for your product on export.gov.

Scarbrough is known for its expertise in HTS classification and schedule B numbers. If you have a question about your Schedule B number or would like us to classify a product for you, please email consulting@scarbrough-intl.com.

What is a surety bond?

U.S. Customs and Border Protection requires that an importer purchase a surety bond to ensure it will pay the required duties and taxes when importing an item. A bond is like an insurance policy that guarantees payment to U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) if a required act is not performed. Surety bonds can be purchased through Scarbrough, regardless if we clear the goods or not.

Bonds have a number of uses in CBP. The most common use allows importers to take possession of their goods before all CBP formalities are completed. Another common use allows a carrier to move goods under bond from one place to another before those goods are actually entered for consumption with duties paid.

There are two types of surety bonds:

Single Transaction Bond – a single transaction bond is a one-time bond. An importer should purchase this bond only if it plans to import 1-2 times and the value isn’t extremely high or there is no PGA involved. Note, if an importer is importing via ocean transport, it is also required to purchase an ISF bond. Click here for pricing.

Continuous Bond – a continuous bond is valid for 12 months from date of purchase and is automatically renewed each year until it is terminated, which can be done so free of charge. An importer should purchase this bond if it plans to import more than 2-4 times in the next 12 months, the value is high, or if a PGA (such as FDA, USDA, etc.) is involved. Note, a continuous bond is required if there is a late ISF.  Click here for pricing.

What is ISF?

Importer Security Filing, also known as “10+2”, is a U.S. Customs and Border protection regulation mandated for ocean cargo imports only. ISF is required to be filed with U.S. Customs and Border Protection 24 hours prior to sailing from last origin port. In other words, importers should send all necessary data to their U.S. Customs Broker prior to order pick up or order shipment. Scarbrough files ISF 72 hours in advance and suggest importers to gather required data from their shippers as soon as possible. Required data elements can be found on this form.

To learn more about Importer Security Filing :

Should I insure my cargo? How much is insurance?

Cargo insurance provides protection against all risks of physical loss or damage to freight from any external cause during shipping, whether by land, sea or air.  All risk insurance includes all risks of physical loss or damage unless excluded which includes: improper packing, abandonment of cargo, rejection by Customs, failure to pay or collect, inherent vice, employee dishonesty, barge shipments, goods subject to an on-deck BOL, losses caused by temperature or pressure, used goods, failure to provide timely notification of loss, loss in excess of policy limits, loss caused by delay or loss of use and/or market (Seasonal merchandise), cyber attack, loss due to strikes or acts of war.

 

Insurance is typically between 0.20 to 0.40 per $100 of freight value + commercial value x 110%, with a minimum of $25.  It is very affordable and goes a long way for the small amount of money paid, so we highly recommend purchasing insurance.  Scarbrough can insure your cargo and claim losses right here in house. Please note, some commodities are much higher based on their frailty, such as granite and marble.

 

To learn more about the Basics of Cargo Insurance, Risk and Liability:

Can you ship to Amazon Warehouses?

Yes, Scarbrough Transportation delivers to Amazon facilities throughout the country on a daily basis.  We are familiar with all Amazon regulations and will seamlessly delivery your freight. For more information and pricing, please email insidesales@scarbrough-intl.com.

Do I need to declare a value even if my shipment is $0.00 ? What about charitable goods?

Yes, you need to declare a value even if you are shipping charitable goods. Watch the video below.